Were Things Better When Habitat’s Logo Was Busier?

stuck truck

In these topsy-turvy times a bro can be forgiven for wondering if we are witnessing some wholesale collapse of ‘the industry.’ One day it’s Jason Dill and AVE leaving Alien Workshop, the next it is rumored to be Grant Taylor, then the Holy See that is the Slap board would have Austyn Gillette, Brian Anderson and Alex Olson all flying their respective coops en route to greener pastures and possibly other mixed metaphors further afield. Meanwhile footwear developers have uniformly failed to achieve, leaving no alternative for Chaz Ortiz to secure sponsorship suitable for his skills than a new shoe company invented by Lil Wayne*. Perhaps most confounding is the news, reported last week by Quartersnacks, that Fred Gall got married (believed to be pictured above, with wedding party).

As we cast about for certainty and stability we look not to flighty teamriders or faddish deck technologies or the shifting cuts of cotton t-shirts, but to the graphic designs crafted to withstand the ravages of time and various silk-screen appliques. Faced with chaos and corporate identity crises, the beleaguered consumer still can safely plunk down funds for hard and soft-goods bearing a Ripper, Oval, Bighead, Flare, or OG of the Blind or Girl persuasion. So it is with Habitat’s famed and beloved ‘Pod’ logo, winner of the best new graphical design by a deck concern for the year 1999; however, a close review demonstrates a subtle shift over the past 13 years. Harken back to the original iteration of the Habitat logo, pictured herewith.

old_hab

In the winter of 1999-2000 the planet was similarly on the cusp of change. Yellow shirts were commonplace and a presidential election approached a fine froth in the U.S., while computer scientists stayed up late searching for a digital harpoon with enough 1s and 0s to slay the fearsome Y2K bug. The Habitat logo as then envisioned offered safety and security, calmly explaining that Habitat was issued under the Sovereign Sect and that the company was focused on coexistence. The hand, leaf/wave and buildings represent ancient hobo hieroglyphs used by Fred Gall to indicate places of safety and prices for lap dances at certain New Jersey strip clubs.

habitat_vinyl_decal

If we skip ahead several chapters to the year 2013 much has changed, and the Pod logo no longer is adorned with horizontal lines and explanatory dialogue. What the Pod has gained in versatility, now shot through with camo, plaid and other patterns, it has shorn off in complexity, occasionally leaving off the H part on the left altogether and just having the circle and leaf thing. The viewer in such instances may be left to fend for his or herself, squinting and gritting teeth to recall aeroplane series, Mr. Dibbs instrumentals and the follow angle on Brian Wenning’s switch backside smith grind at Love Park. With so much now in question across the industry, should Habitat consider adding back some hot new glyph action to the logo? Have companies generally simplified their logos to shave weight from t-shirts and hopefully secure more X-Games medallions? Is Habitat only following the minimalist trek of technology hardware developers, rumored to be developing a new mouse with one button that does not click or connect to any computer?

*Perhaps more troubling is the growing realization that Trukfit and Spectre could ultimately dilute the already-established market for Hot Boy Wear.

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6 Responses to “Were Things Better When Habitat’s Logo Was Busier?”

  1. Cos Says:

    ” … Perhaps most confounding is the news, reported last week by Quartersnacks, that Fred Gall got married. ”

  2. wingocheddar Says:

    New logo is better. Personally in my opinion, when a company is establishing their brand identity, the simpler, the better. The OG look is great for a deck graphic, or t-shirt design, but in the end, the simplified version is just a better logo design. Look to some of the most iconic logos (ie, BMW, VW, Target, McDonald’s, etc.), the more a design communicates with simplicity, generally, the better it is. Horizontal Lines at the top and bottom of the design are factors of a graphic, the most likely wont stand the test of time (trends), and it’s probably smartest to just get rid of them from the get go. Good article.

  3. sloop john b Says:

    Alien and Habitat are done. They’ve been irrelevant since Mosaic. Habitat will go under and Alien will be sold and become the new World Industries and start making wakeboards and shit. Rob Dyrdek can take his millions and suck a dick. Who cares.

  4. Mike stroh Says:

    Alien and habitat are both losing it. I was inside a zumiez the other day and saw a street league alien board and a habitat longboard. There’s no hope left…

  5. Anonymous Says:

    No?

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